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I’m often asked how I became an Animal Communicator.

If you just knew the process, the requirements, you could be one too, right?

Maybe! The path to becoming an animal communicator is dependent on many things though, and likely to be different for each of us.

But, in the event that it gives you some insights and things to try, here’s how it happened for me!

1. Lifelong love of animals.

That one’s easy, right?! If you’ve always had a close affinity to animals, either having your own ponies or pets growing up or always being drawn to your friend’s pet, you probably already have a good feel for their emotions and opinions. Paying attention to their likes and dislikes, observing their routines and feelings, and just enjoying their company is a great start to a deeper connection.

I had hamsters first as a child, then my own cat, and we always had a family dog. I had riding lessons and hung out with friends that had ponies. All my life I gravitated towards animals rather than people.

2. Working with animals.

For me, working with horses for 20 years (as a western riding instructor, then a horsemanship coach / problem solver, then teaching horse and rider bio-mechanics), definitely deepened the understanding and connection I had with them. You can certainly achieve that by having your own animals, perhaps by training them yourself or competing with them. But working with other people’s horses / animals puts you in contact with much bigger numbers, which provides a greater depth of experience. The more practice you can get with many animals, the better.

3. Curiosity and Learning

I always wanted to know more and so attended lots of clinics, workshops, and courses. Watching many different clinicians work helped clarify for me what I did and didn’t like in terms of working and communicating with horses, and kept me searching for more information.

I learned many new disciplines and modalities, moving from western riding, to horsemanship and dressage, then bio-mechanics, bodywork and energy work. (Read more about me here.)

This progression took me deeper and deeper into really feeling what was going on with horses; not just paying attention to their body language, but also their energy.

My curiosity and thirst to learn more also meant lots of reading; books by other Animal Communictors, energy workers, psychics and clairvoyants. Realising that everyone worked slightly differently and recieved their information in different ways was really useful.

4. Learn some Energy work

For me this started with Reiki; I did levels 1 + 2 back in Scotland. If feeling energy doesn’t come naturally to you – and it doesn’t to everyone (and didn’t to me) – this is a great place to start. Learning how to feel energy, how to balance it, and how to do hands on or off healing, will get you out of your head and introduce you to sensations and visuals that can help your animal communication.

5. Meditate

If you’re groaning at this point – because meditation is just too hard, right?! – stop! Believe me, I’ve been there. I tried all sorts of ways to meditate for several years with zero success.

My top tip is to meditate in a group, especially an experienced one, so find out if there are any near you. Group meditation amplifies the energy, which means that it kind of fast tracks your experiences; you have access to much more information than you’ll ever manage on your own. (Join my weekly online meditation group here.)

Joining a well established meditation group was the catalyst that opened me up to all sorts of experiences I had previously only wished for. (You can read some of the experiences I had in People of the Earth.) I was introduced to all sorts of new information, and ways of connecting to energy and other beings, which led to me practicing new things with my horse clients.

Meditation actually has a couple of uses. Firstly, going into a meditative state is most likely the way that you will practice your animal communication. Secondly, it’s a great thing to do just for yourself; it’s calming, healing, raises your vibration, and maintains your good energetic connection with the Universe.

In the spirit of both meditating and learning, one of the courses I did was a weekend Shamanic Journeying workshop. I loved that; it taught me different ways to meditate, new questions I could ask, and gave me more confidence in what I was experiencing.

6. Practice.

Practice, practice, practice.

With something as intangible as Animal Communication, practice is really important. Not all animal communicators get streams of clear conversation from animals – I don’t. It’s only by observing how you personally receive your information (eg words, pictures, colours, feelings) that you can start to translate them and figure out their significance.

7. Get feedback

Getting feedback or confirmation when you practice is also really helpful. Make sure you get the owners of the horses or pets you practice with to tell you whether you were accurate or not; that will really help you not just hone your skills but also reassure you and boost your confidence in your abilities.

In my closed Facebook group we do regular animal communication practice / challenges, with feedback – join us here.

Will that path work for you?

It might – and it might not.

Sometimes things just happen when they’re supposed to, and no amount of pushing or ‘doing all the things’ will make it happen any faster. Perhaps you’re supposed to be an animal communicator, perhaps you are not.

Overall though, I believe that if you want it badly enough, if you stay open and curious to it and you develop your skills in connecting with, observing, and healing animals, you’ve got a pretty good shot!

If you’ve been dabbling with animal communication but feel stuck, or you’re doubting your abilities and the information you’re receiving, check out my free training, ‘Deepen your Connection with your Horse‘.

Keep connecting with your horses,

Trisha x

Want to experience an Animal Communication session?

If you’ve been struggling to get clear information from your own horse or animal, it can really help to have an impartial stranger chat to them instead! Book your Animal Communication session here, then send me a photo of your horse (anything is fine) with their name.

About Trisha

Trisha Wren has been an equine professional for most of her adult life.  She rode, competed, and taught Western Riding for 15 years in Scotland, then horse and rider bio-mechanics in New Zealand and Australia.  She’s been a full time horse and animal communicator since April 2016, and also runs regular Animal Communication online workshops.  Find out more about Trisha here.


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